About Me

For the past several years, I have been blogging here as  EEC Chick. I began the blog to raise awareness about my condition, and most of my earlier blog posts were really focused on the EEC aspect of my life.You can read my About EEC Chick here.

In more recent times, I have felt the urge to write about other things in my life. Of course I still want to raise awareness of EEC and demonstrate that having EEC doesn’t have to keep anyone from living a normal life, but I think I can still do that just by living life and writing about it.

If you only want to read about EEC-related stuff, that’s cool. You can use the tools in the sidebar to search, or sort posts by tag. I also write about travel, art, religion (or more specifically, losing my religion), and whatever happens to be on my mind at any given moment.

So what’s with the new name?

First, a little background: Calluna vulgaris is the Moorland Heather on Nought Moor near Pateley Bridgescientific name for the family of plants known as heather. Heather grows abundantly on the moorlands and hills of Scotland, where my paternal grandfather’s family hailed from. My parents named me Heather as an homage to this Scottish ancestry. Admittedly, I haven’t been to Scotland (yet) to see the fields of heather for myself, but I love that this is what my name represents.

Why call the site calluna raris instead of calluna vulgaris?

Vulgaris is the latin adjective meaning common. I don’t know if anything about me is really common. I’ve got a funky genetic disorder, I grew up in a funky religion, and… well, I’m one of a kind! So I chose the latin adjective raris, because it means rare or uncommon.

So there you have it. I hope you enjoy reading what I write and looking at the images I post!

Contact me! heather@callunararis.com






4 thoughts on “About Me

  1. Brian says:

    Have you read/watched the Outlander series. Everything you wanted to know about Scottish culture in a great fiction story.

  2. Guestspeaker says:

    Hopefully once in your life you shall be able to come to see not only the moorlands and hills of Scotland, but also the heather of the English moorlands and the heather of the Belgian heathlands.

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