Tag Archives: swimming

Late Spring Inspired Memories


Hi there!

I’m sitting outside on this lovely evening and I’ve been itching to blog for days now. There is a lot on my mind and I want to write about these things, but they are too hard right now. So instead, I will write about something that makes me happy.

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Awkward garden selfie. Disregard the towering bags of mulch behind me!

 

This time of year always awakens excitement in me. Perhaps this is a remnant of my schoolgirl days, when the arrival of warm weather, insects chirping outside the open windows, and being able to wear shorts again were signals that school was almost over for the year.

It’s no secret that I was not a big fan of school. Just like it’s no secret that I am not a big fan of work. Hah! Of course I always enjoyed learning and doing interesting things, but school, like work, wasn’t always fun and games.

From Memorial Day onward, school got fun. It was like we could all see the light at the end of the tunnel. Countdowns of remaining school days were chalked out on the board. Teachers would conduct classes with the lights off, to keep the room cooler (did it though?) Rules could be bent a little. The excitement was palpable.

Summer was hands down my favorite time of year as a kid. Waking up in the full light of day to the scent of freshly cut grass and moseying on down to the kitchen for a bowl of cereal was soon followed by asking Mom if I could go in the pool. Usually pool activities were reserved for after lunch, when it was hotter and after Mom had been able to get some things done around the house, but it never hurt to ask. I loved that pool so much. While on land I often felt clunky and awkward, once I was in the water I felt as graceful as a dolphin. Mind you, I may have looked awkward to anyone watching, but I was having fun.

Geronimo
Freedom, oh free-dom!

Sometimes we would take trips down to the shore. My great-grandparents had a trailer down in Somers Point, and we would stay there for a couple of days at a time through the summer. Days would be spent alternately choking down seawater as I attempted to play in the waves and getting burnt to a crisp on the beach, while evenings were spent chowing down steak sandwiches or pizza and then going on rides along the boardwalk in Ocean City. As a kid, I thought Ocean City was the most magical place ever.

As you can see, a couple of day of warm weather and I’m easily transported back to the enthusiasm I had for summer as a young kid. I only wish I could have the amount of time off that I did back then! Maybe it’s time to reconsider my career path…

Speaking of which, tomorrow I’m off to Chicago, but I will be leaving exactly 24 hours later. Talk about a whirlwind trip!

 

Swimming with Suzanne


Water. How I have always loved water. Whether it be in a bath tub or a swimming pool, I want to be in it.

Swimming allowed me to be weightless and graceful, while on land I was clumsy and awkward. Being in the pool was like being in another world – one where I never got too hot, and when I felt tired I could just float along and listen to the gentle waves lapping against the edges.

Summertime = Pool Time
Summertime = Pool Time

When I was a young lass of 3 years old, my mother decided it would be wise for this little fish to take swimming lessons. She signed me up for a a program of gymnastics, crafts and swimming at the local YMCA. She also thought it would be a good opportunity for me to make friends and prepare me for kindergarten.

On the first day of swimming class, my mother helped me change in the locker room. Neither one of us had any idea that we were about to meet someone special. I walked out into the warm, humid pool area and lined up with the other children by the edge of the pool. My mom sat in an observation area with the other mothers as the instructor introduced herself. Her name was Suzanne.

Suzanne had hands and feet like mine.

The significance of this was lost on me at the time. I wasn’t aware how rare my condition was or how unusual it was to run into another person with EEC. I just thought it was neat that this woman looked like me! My mother, however, was overcome with emotion. She had never met anyone else with EEC and here, just by chance, was Suzanne.

Long after my swimming lessons were over, my mom kept in touch with Suzanne. She must have asked her so many questions and Suzanne patiently answered them. As I grew up, Suzanne was always referenced whenever I had surgery or a health situation to deal with. “Suzanne went through this”, my mom would say.  “Suzanne said…” my mom would start off, when I wondered about how something was going to go. Over the years we lost touch with Suzanne, and her presence fell to the back of my mind.

It wasn’t until I got involved with the NFED that I started thinking of her again. During the planning stages of the 2012 family conference, I was given a list of people who were registered for that year. Scanning the list, I saw Suzanne’s name and address. I wondered if it was really her. I couldn’t even remember what she looked like.

Sure enough, she and her kids were at the conference. The first day in the EEC syndrome specific group, we sat in a circle and introduced ourselves. I knew who she was even before she said her name. After the session ended, I caught up with her in the hall. “Suzanne! Do you remember me?” I asked.

Suzanne and I reunited at the NFED Conference in Orlando in 2012.
Suzanne and I reunited at the NFED Conference in Orlando in 2012.

 

Of course she remembered me. As I’ve come to find out, meeting others with EEC is not something anyone easily forgets. I’ve also realized just how lucky I was to have met Suzanne when I was little. Before the internet, there was no easy way to find others with EEC. Meeting her and knowing that she had been down the path ahead of me was a great source of strength and encouragement for me. I’ve met adults who didn’t know there were others with their condition until they were in their 40’s and 50’s!  It must be a lonely feeling to spend most of your life thinking you’re the only one. 

I also got to meet Suzanne’s son at the conference. Isn’t he cute?

This handsome guy is Suzanne's son Tyler, who is also affected by EEC.
Suzanne’s son Tyler, who is also affected by EEC.

I’m not really sure how to conclude this post except to say that I thank my lucky stars that I had Suzanne to look up to while I was growing up. I hope I can be the same for other little girls and boys out there with EEC. While sometimes my “EEC issues” can get old, I wouldn’t trade it for the world.  I’ve met so many amazing people because of it. I am continually inspired and encouraged by the strength and positive attitudes of my EEC friends and the people that love them.